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Journal Articles Energy Policy Year : 2012

The Kyoto mechanisms and the diffusion of renewable energy technologies in the BRICS

Abstract

This paper examines whether the Kyoto mechanisms have stimulated the diffusion of renewable energy technologies in the BRICS, i.e. Brazil, Russian, India China and South Africa. We examine the patterns of diffusion of renewable energy technologies in the BRICS, the factors associated with their diffusion, and the incentives provided by the Kyoto mechanisms. Preliminary analysis suggests that the Kyoto mechanisms may be supporting the spread of existing technologies, regardless if such technologies are still closely tied to environmental un-sustainability, rather than the development and diffusion of more sustainable variants of renewable energy technologies. This raises questions about the incentives provided by the Kyoto mechanisms for the diffusion of cleaner variants of renewable energy technologies in the absence of indigenous technological efforts and capabilities in sustainable variants, and national policy initiatives to attract and build on Kyoto mechanism projects. We provide an empirical analysis using aggregated national data from the World Development Indicators, the International Energy Agency, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and secondary sources.
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Dates and versions

hal-01488032 , version 1 (13-03-2017)

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Isabel Maria Bodas Freitas, Eva Dantas, Michiko Iizuka. The Kyoto mechanisms and the diffusion of renewable energy technologies in the BRICS. Energy Policy, 2012, 42 (March 2012), pp.118-128. ⟨10.1016/j.enpol.2011.11.055⟩. ⟨hal-01488032⟩

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